EU & anti-corruption

EU level engagement with countries on anti-corruption issues – whether with Member States, countries that are candidates for membership, or the rest of the world – has frequently focused on institutional and legislative reforms, such as passing anti-bribery legislation or establishing anti-corruption agencies. There remains a significant ‘implementation gap’ between anti-corruption rules and actual practice, often due to the inability or unwillingness to make use of the available enforcement mechanisms. However, the EU and the European Commission in particular has not fully recognised the role that civil society can have in changing norms and achieving better implementation and enforcement. The EU needs to focus on faciliating anti-corruption efforts of governments in Member States and non-EU countries and on creating a space for meaningful engagement with civil society. 

  • Sustainable Development
  • Whistleblowing
  • Forest governance
  • EU Spending
  • Enlargement

About Sustainable Development

Together, the European Union and its Member States are the world’s largest aid donor providing over half of all global development aid. Development policy at the EU level is currently being revised in light of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Abuses of power and financial, natural and other resources continues to have serious negative impacts on development, aggravating poverty, conflicts and political, social and economic instabilities. Every year an estimated $1 trillion of illicit financial flows leave developing countries in the form of tax evasion, embezzlement, bribes, money laundering and smuggling. These illicit financial flows are now rising twice as fast as global GDP, depriving countries and their people of resources that could be put towards achieving trans-formative sustainable development gains.

We want to ensure that EU development aid addresses and is subject to anti-corruption efforts. The EU needs to develop an overarching EU Sustainable Development Strategy that includes both internal and external action, including a plan of implementation, with concrete targets and timelines. This strategy should coordinate the EU’s overall achievement of the 2030 Agenda, each of the 17 SDGs, 169 targets and the use of agreed indicators, to help the EU and its member states focus clearly on what needs to be achieved, and how. The EU also needs to develop strong monitoring, review and accountability mechanisms and consider citizen-generated data to help track progress towards the achievement of the Goals.

 

Related Projects

Anti-Corruption Advocacy for Sustainable Development

Fighting corruption for a sustainable future

EU Forest Governance

What is the problem? REDD+ is a UN-initiated scheme aimed at shifting the forest economy from short-term profit to long-term security by offering financial incentives to forest-rich countries to hold onto their woodland. It refers to “reducing...

Recent News

Article

Keeping climate finance free from corruption

Last November amid the burgundy red buildings and blues skies of Marrakech countries from all over the globe came together for the annual Conference of Parties (COP) meeting on climate change. One of the agreements to come out of the COP 22 was to...

About Whistleblowing

A key challenge in preventing and fighting corruption is to detect and expose bribery, fraud, theft of public funds and other acts of wrongdoing. One of the most direct methods of shining the light on corruption is whistleblowing. Unfortunately, whistleblowers commonly face retaliation in the form of harassment, firing, blacklisting, threats and even physical violence, and their disclosures are routinely ignored.

We work to ensure that the EU institutions are fulfilling their legal obligations to provide comprehensive and robust protections for EU staff whistleblowers. We are also currently advocating for the Commission to come forward for a proposal for an EU directive on whistleblower protection.

Recent News

Event

A year after the Panama Papers: Where does the EU stand?

A year after the Panama Papers: Where does the EU stand?” This is the question we will try to answer during a high-level panel held on the occasion of the launch of Transparency International report Behind the corporate scenes – Enhancing...

About Forest governance

Corruption can negatively affect climate and contribute to global warming through the pursuit of personal profit over sustainable production. One of the leading causes of global warming is deforestation and forest degradation.

The link between corruption and deforestation has been almost universally recognised. Corruption within and around the forest sector undermines design, implementation and subsequent monitoring of policies aimed at conserving forest cover, while also jeopardising development goals and poverty alleviation in many countries.

The World Bank estimates that up to US$23 billion worth of wood is illegally cut each year, which results in lost revenue of US$10 billion. In some countries, 90% of all logging activities are illegal. As most of these forests are in the developing world, it robs these societies of precious revenue, thwarting development goals and keeping people in poverty. Therefore, besides deforestation, illegal logging undermines the rights of forest-dependent communities and fuels violence and conflict.

Current development aid programmes, aiming to tackle illegal logging and improve forest governance, do not adequately address the corruption challenges. Indeed, they can perpetuate corruption by partnering with corrupt companies, officials and politicians at the root of the problem. Without understanding the role of corruption in the sector and strengthening measures to tackle it, programmes aimed to improve forest governance are unlikely to succeed.

The European Union is a key consumer market for tropical timber coming from countries with high levels of corruption in fragile and/or conflict affected countries, and has bilateral agreements in place with many of these timber producing countries. Therefore, the EU is uniquely placed to promote and pursue fundamental reforms to tackle corruption in partnership with these countries.

Related Projects

Anti-Corruption Advocacy for Sustainable Development

Fighting corruption for a sustainable future

EU Forest Governance

What is the problem? REDD+ is a UN-initiated scheme aimed at shifting the forest economy from short-term profit to long-term security by offering financial incentives to forest-rich countries to hold onto their woodland. It refers to “reducing...

Recent News

Article

Keeping climate finance free from corruption

Last November amid the burgundy red buildings and blues skies of Marrakech countries from all over the globe came together for the annual Conference of Parties (COP) meeting on climate change. One of the agreements to come out of the COP 22 was to...

About EU Spending

The EU oversees an annual budget of approximately € 155 billion in taxpayers’ money. We are working to increase the transparency and accountability of how this money is spent by the both the EU institutions and national authorities to ensure that these funds are not misused.

 

Related Projects

Eurozone Economic Governance

How transparent are they institutions which govern the Euro?

European Corruption Observatory

The European Corruption Observatory is an online database of media articles about cases of corruption in the European Union. This online tool fosters awareness around transboundary corruption trends and allows citizens, journalists and civil society...

Open Budgets

Openness and transparency can act as a disincentive to corruption in public spending. The current lack of open budget and expenditure data makes it impossible for citizens to get a comprehensive overview on how EU funds are being spent....

Recent News

Article

3 ways MEPs can fiddle expenses

The Westminster expenses scandal in the UK back in 2009 made headlines with journalists uncovering parliamentarians using their expenses to redecorate their home homes, evade taxes and one MP even used expenses to build a duck house. This lead to a...
Article

Integrity Pacts – state of play

Through transparency and monitoring Integrity Pacts improve trust and accountability in public procurement. Here you can find details of these Integrity Pacts.

About Enlargement

The EU has uniquely close access to the countries in its neighbourhood and, especially, those who are undergoing the accession process. In its development efforts here, the EU must not forget to include anti-corruption measures.

Related Projects

Anti-Corruption Advocacy for Sustainable Development

Fighting corruption for a sustainable future

National Integrity Systems in the Western Balkans and Turkey

What is the problem? In its Enlargement Strategy for 2013–2014 the European Commission has again highlighted that the rule of law is at the heart of the enlargement process, a key pillar of the Copenhagen political criteria. Continuous efforts...

Recent News

Article

Cashback? Bringing stolen assets back to Ukraine

When former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych fled the country at the end of the Maidan revolution protestors in 2014, activists and citizens visited his now abandoned Mezhyhirya mansion. What they witnessed was the shear amount of wealth that...
Article

Corruption and the ‘arc of instability’

This article originally appeared on Europe’s World. You can find the original here. The late, fantastic novelist Gabriel García Márquez once wrote that ‘the most important thing in a good marriage is not happiness, but stability.’ There...